The news is by your side.

After turning fodder producer, Mysuru zoo attains self-sufficiency

It has stopped procuring Napier grass from suppliers since October 1 after it started harvesting grass in bulk from a wasteland at its rescue centre

The COVID-19 crisis-hit Mysuru zoo has found a new way of cost-cutting and attaining self–sufficiency in meeting the forage needs for its captive herbivores since its revenue has dropped substantially.

Most zoos largely rely on gate collections for their maintenance and they had been closed till June due to lockdown. In spite of reopening, they are yet to get back the pre-COVID-19 era footfall and revenue, forcing them to look for cost-cutting exercises.

The Mysuru zoo, which was financially backing smaller zoos, was yet to recover from the blow that came with the pandemic. The footfall continues to be unenthusiastic though it has improved marginally in recent weeks. From 8,000-10,000 visitors a day to 1200-1500 visitors a day, the city’s most popular tourist attraction is starved of visitors, and the revenue loss could impact its projects.

In this grim situation, the zoo management came up with an idea of saving on forage crops that were procured for feeding the herbivores.

From October 1, the zoo has stopped procuring the forage crops, especially Napier grass from outside, as it has attained self-sufficiency in its production. With this, it can save at least ₹25 lakh a year.

Zoo Executive Director Ajit Kulkarni told The Hindu that the zoo has started cultivating these crops at Koorgalli where it runs the animal rescue centre. The unused landscape, a wasteland, in the area was being used exclusively to cultivate the crops since the pandemic outbreak.

“We are today harvesting 1,300-1,500 kg a day, saving a lot of money. Forage crops worth ₹60,000 were procured daily from suppliers. This has been stopped now.”

The conical-shaped wasteland measuring nine acres is situated below the high-tension transmission line at the Chamundi Animal Rescue Centre.

With one sowing, the grass can be harvested for two years. From 300-400 kg of grass a day, the harvest has gone above 1,000 kg a day, Mr. Kulkarni added.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Source link

All About Belagavi
________________________________________________
Disclaimer: This News Has Not Been Created Or Edited By AllAboutBelagavi.Publisher: Thehindu

Shree Panjurlli Fine Dine ADD

- Advertisement -

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.